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Neurobiology Co-culture system

Neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration are key features in a range of chronic CNS diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, along with acute conditions like stroke and traumatic brain injury. Crosstalk between neurons, astrocytes and microglia has been shown to play a significant role in neuroinflammatory and neurodegenerative responses.

To address the shortcomings of existing in vitro models, our team is developing complex and robust multicellular culture models comprised of the three major cell types that play critical roles in neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration: human iPSC-derived neurons, astrocytes and microglia in chemically defined media.

Contact us to find out how our co-culture model and assays can be adapted to your research.

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Day 7 co-culture:

Early neural network activity of neuron and astrocyte co-cultures display no synchronised firing.

Neuronal traces of an early co-culture:

Neuron and astrocyte co-cultures initially display no synchronisation of neuronal firing. Each individual line represents a masked neuron.

Day 15 co-culture:

As neuron and astrocyte co-cultures mature neuronal firing becomes synchronised.

Neuronal traces of a mature co-culture:

As neuron and astrocyte co-cultures mature the neuronal firing becomes synchronised. Each individual line represents a masked neuron.

Treatment of a mature co-culture with an NMDA agonist:

Treating mature neuron and astrocyte co-cultures with NMDA agonists can interfere with neuronal network synchronization.

Neuronal traces of a mature co-culture after NMDA agonist treatment:

Loss of neuronal network synchronization was seen 2 hours after treating a mature neuron and astrocyte co-culture with an NMDA agonist.

Mean correlation of mature co-cultures treated with an NMDA agonist:

Treating mature neuronal and astrocyte co-cultures with an NMDA agonist resulted in a dose dependent loss of neuronal network synchronisation. Feeding the co-cultures over several days corrected the loss in synchronisation.